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on the national debt. >> tom: and on capitol hill, new questions about the role of high frequency trading and u.s. markets. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> tom: there was more evidence today of the struggling global economy. stocks around the globe sank on weak japanese trade figures, as well as a drop in chinese manufacturing activity for the eleventh straight month. the news here wasn't better. the conference board's index of leading economic indicators edged down a 0.1% in august, suggesting growth will stay sluggish in the second half. so, it's no surprise that the international monetary fund announced today it plans to cut its global growth forecast by a few decimal points when it releases its report next month. the i.m.f.'s currently forecast calls for growth of 3.5% this year, and 3.9% next. erika miller reports. >> reporter: global economic growth appears to be hitting a wall. a "bric" wall that is. there's growing evidence that economic growth is slowing in virtually every part of the globe, even the world's fastest growing economies. the term "bric" was coined a decade a
case today that the u.s. economy needs more stimulus and he's ready to give it another dose to boost growth. his message was clear and delivered with conviction. investors around the world had been waiting eagerly to hear the fed chairman's speech in jackson hole wyoming and stocks in the u.s. rallied in reaction. here are the highlights: bernanke said even though the economy has benefited from fed policies over the past few years. the outlook is still quote "far from satisfactory." he described the high unemployment rate a grave concern. he believes the fed should continue using non-traditional policies to spur growth. and bernanke concluded by saying the fed will provide additional policy accommodation as needed. >> tom: that statement was a buy signal for investors. they bought up stocks on the belief that the fed is on the verge of taking more action to stimulate the economy. blue chips rallied triple digits but pulled back by the close. the dow jumped 90 points. the nasdaq added 18 and the s&p rose seven. traders liked what they heard from the bernanke today. >> traders saw some
, to rising fees for a.t.m.'s and overdrafts, a new survey shows free checking is anything but. and apple sells five million iphone 5's over the weekend, but some expected more. that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> tom: u.s. investors began the week focused again on the global economy. the latest sign of worry: business confidence fell in germany for a fifth straight month in september. the international monetary fund today called on the international community to help finance the bailouts of euro- zone countries. that had u.s. markets following global markets lower. the dow fell 20 points, the nasdaq lost 19 and the s&p was down three. those worries in europe, are part of the reason the international monetary fund is shaving it's outlook for the global economy. the i.m.f.'s managing director says the trend has been clearly heading down. and, as darren gersh reports, she is calling on leaders in europe and the u.s. to change direction. >> reporter: the managing director of the i.m.f. has been described as the world's chief financial fire fighter. and today, christine lagarde urged policy
on auto exports, china fires back on unfair trade practices by the u.s. from stocks to oil and gold prices, we get the outlook for what to expect between now and the end of the year. and a birthday for "occupy wall street". while protests and arrests mark the movement's first anniversary, a look at what it's accomplished. that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! trade tensions between the united states and china are heating up again. this morning, the two countries challenged each other in the world trade organization. the u.s. is accusing china of illegally subsidizing auto and auto parts exports, and hurting u.s. made goods. and china claims trade laws here, open the door for illegal tariffs on a wide range of chinese products. sylvia hall breaks down what's behind the latest flareup. >> reporter: here in the u.s., the auto and auto parts industries employ about 800,000 american workers. the government says those workers are hurt by the money china gives to subsidize its own auto industry. and in ohio, a key swing state fueled by cars, president obama promised a crack down: >> these are subsid
the papers with the i.r.s. in may, 2013. >> so i could get money for my (c) (4), use that for political purposes, and nobody knows anything about it till six months after the election? >> that's right. and even then, they won't -- >> that -- >> -- know who your donors are. >> that's my kind of campaign finance restriction. >>> welcome, trevor potter. >> thank you. >> you know that's funny, but it's not a laughing matter by november we'll be drowning in money. this flood just keeps rising. i brought a story in "the financial times." a campaign group backing barack obama is pushing to raise up to $150 million in coming weeks, you know, tit for tat, to counter the republican's financial advantage and an expected advertising blitz for mitt romney. and that just strikes me as an all-out, inescapable arms race. >> in a way, and i know this will sound a little odd that's not entirely a bad outcome for this election. because what -- where we have been is that the republicans have proven they have an enormous advantage of raising money. therefore, they have-and i'm a republican. but the party ha
changer in the defense industry, two of europe's biggest players look to join forces, just as the u.s. defense industry prepares to slim down. >> susie: the latest census numbers are in, and a record 46 million people remain below the poverty line. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: thinner, faster, taller. we're talking about apple's hotly anticipated iphone 5. it was unveiled today in san francisco, and investors were impressed, juicing the shares up to $669 a share. but does the new device live up to the hype? erika miller takes a closer look at whether the new iphone will be fruitful for apple. >> reporter: this is the new device that could upset the apple cart in the smartphone industry. apple c.e.o. tim cook unveiled the iphone 5 in san francisco. and it has new features designed to fend off competition from rival android phones. >> it is an absolute jewel. it is the most beautiful product we have ever made bar none. >> reporter: now the nitty gritty: the phone is made entirely of glass and aluminum. so it's 18% thinner, and 20% lighter than the last version. i
% of the s&p 500 index. thanks to apple's huge gain this year, the s&p is up 14%. on the other hand, the apple-less dow is up only 9%. and don't forget the tech-heavy nasdaq. apple accounts for 13% of the weighting in that index. thanks to the shine in apple shares, the nasdaq is up 19% this year. with apple's outsized influence on the market, a warm welcome for iphone 5 tomorrow might make more than apple shareholders happy. but some market pros say it's a stretch to think apple has kidnapped the stock market. >> i would not argue that, as apple goes, so goes the market. i think there's a lot of other sectors that we're also paying attention to. and granted, we've been overweight the technology sector, but we're also overweight things like materials and the consumer discretionary sectors. >> reporter: still, even wren concedes apple's effect on the market is more than mathematical; it's also emotional. which brings us back to the iphone 5, likely to get a good reception tomorrow from techies. but if history is any guide, investors might sell apple shares when the phone debuts. >> w
help for the economy, coming in three days. the u.s. central bank holds a two-day policy meeting this week, ending thursday afternoon, perhaps by announcing more stimulus. stock investors today were tentative ahead of the meeting. the dow slipped 52 points. the nasdaq lost about 32 and the s&p 500 dipped nearly nine. we start with suzanne pratt looking at what options remain for the fed, and how investors might react to them. >> reporter: as has been the case frequently this year, all eyes here on wall street, have been looking south about 200 miles, to washington. what traders have been watching is what happens here at the federal reserve. and, this week is no different, more watching and waiting for more stimulus. it is widely anticipated fed policymakers will decide once again to step in and try help the economy. >> we're expecting another round of quantitative easing, q.e.3., they'll probably buy mainly u.s. treasury securities. at the same time, they'll probably extend the language on when they expect to be hiking rates from 2014 to 2015. but, even if the market gets more as
of economic numbers. manufacturing activity in the u.s. dropped for the third straight month. the institute of supply management's gauge of manufacturing slipped in august to 49.6, the lowest reading in two years. american factories have been a critical source of new jobs. a separate report showed that spending on construction projects in july dropped. that decline comes after three months of gains. all that discouraging news weighed on stocks. the dow lost 55 points, the nasdaq added eight, and the s&p fell by almost two points. >> tom: all this data on the economy comes as we begin what's traditionally the toughest month to be a shareholder. there's no shortage of uncertainty this september for investors-- the election in full-swing, europe and the approaching tax hikes and spending cuts. here's suzanne pratt. >> reporter: august on wall street can be downright dull, with little volume and few headlines. but history shows september can be trouble, particularly for stock investors. since 1929, the s&p 500 has lost an average of 1.2% in september, making it the worst month of the year for s
advertising the older 4-s version its store today. the company is also facing backlash against its new map app. the software replaces google maps and websites have already sprung up mocking apple's innacuracies. but that controversy didn't seem to hinder sales today. >> i'm pretty sure an update will clear everything up anyway. it's that simple. >> reporter: by midday, lines at many apple stores were already much shorter. but don't be fooled. this is expected to be the largest consumer electronics debut in history. by some estimates, apple could sell as many as 10 million iphones by monday morning. that would be twice what was sold the opening weekend for the last iphone model, the 4-s. for apple, a lot is riding on this launch. the iphone is its best-selling product. >> the iphone 5 drives approximately 70% of the profitability for apple. so this probably their most critical product launch out of all their product lines. and, to the extent that apple only comes out with a new iphone on an annual basis, clearly, this makes or breaks the year. >> reporter: apple shares didn't get much of a pop
billions of dollars to buy bonds to rev up the u.s. economy and create more jobs. on wall street, investors applauded the move and stocks surged. as policymakers wrapped up a two-day meeting, they said they took this action because, without it, economic growth might not be strong enough to create jobs. but the fed's latest round of quantitative easing, what everyone calls q.e.-3, is different this time. the fed will buy mortgage backed securities rather than u.s. treasuries. it will buy $40 billion per month. more importantly, the fed said the buying is open-ended-- it promised to keep buying until the job market "improves substantially." and the fed pledged to keep interest rates "exceptionally low" through 2015. stocks rallied right after the fed announcement. the dow jumped 206 points, the nasadaq rose 41.5, and the s&pd. fed chairman ben bernanke described today's move as "a main street policy." darren gersh reports. >> if you are unemployed or worried about keeping your job, the federal reserve today had a clear message for you-- "we're here to help." federal reserve chairman ben berna
clinton tonight in charlotte. my guess is we'll get a great rendition of how good things were in the 1990s but we're not going to hear much about how things have been in the last four years. >> holman: meanwhile republican presidential nominee mitt romney continued debate preparations at a private home in vermont. however he took a quick trip to an appliance store in nearby lebanon, new hampshire, where he spoke with supporters about the needs of small business. wall street hesitated today, after a profit warning from the shipping giant fed-ex. the company said it's being hurt by a slowdown in business-- the latest sign that the global economy is dialing back. that was enough to keep stocks in check. the dow jones industrial average gained 11 points to close at 13,047. the nasdaq fell five points to close at 3,069. the passage of hurricane isaac has exposed oil from the 2010 spill, along the louisiana and alabama coastline. b.p. acknowledged today that the oily tar came from its record- breaking leak at a gulf well site. the tar balls and mats had been buried under sand since then, but re-
, this man says all that red ink is a national security issue. former senator sam nunn joins u.s. >> susie: and with record low interest rates continuing, where best to invest in bonds, it's tonight's "street critique." >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the housing recovery is looking better and better. more economic data showing that the housing sector is getting stronger. sales of existing homes jumped nearly 8% last month to a 4.82 million unit annual rate. that's a two-year high. construction of new homes and apartments rose 2.3%. the big gain was in single family homes. erika miller takes a closer look behind the numbers and gives us a status report on the housing recovery. >> reporter: when it comes to real estate, august is typically a slow month, but the latest housing data suggests there was strong momentum heading into the fall. the median price for a home resale surged to $187,400 during the month. that's up nearly 10% from a year ago-- the biggest year-over-year price increase since the housing boom went bust. that wasn't the only encouraging sign. distressed
it to stay the same. the obama campaign is also pointing to some revised job numbers to make its case. the u.s. bureau of labor statistics said yesterday there were nearly 400,000 more jobs created in the previous year that ended in march. that would mean that there are a higher number of jobs than when president obama took office. but the u.s. still has four million fewer jobs since before the collapse of the financial sector. there's other sobering data as well, showing a still sluggish recovery. the commerce department revised its estimate of second-quarter economic growth down yesterday from 1.7%. mitt romney seized on the change in springfield, virginia. >> we are at 1.3%. this is... this is unacceptable. >> woodruff: other economic indicators also paint a mixed picture. the stock market itself, while down today, has been climbing in recent weeks to its highest levels in nearly five years. today, the dow jones industrial average lost almost 49 points after a weak manufacturing report and worries over europe to close just over 13,437. and the housing market may be stabilizing. a key index
: demonstrators protested outside u.s. embassies around the arab world today, two days after the american consulate in libya was attacked. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we have new details about the killing of the u.s. ambassador in bengazi and the film that fueled the anger there and elsewhere. >> brown: plus, we get perspective on the middle east nearly two years after the arab spring uprisings. is it now a more dangerous place? >> woodruff: then, as the federal reserve unleashes a new program to encourage job creation, we assess the potential impact on consumers and the u.s. economy. >> brown: fred de sam lazaro reports on a helping hand for low-income american entrepreneurs, inspired by loans offered in the developing world. >> i used it to purchase about 30 handmade senegalese drums. >> we used the money to fix the store. >> we used the microgrant dollars for, at the time, was to... more signage. >> woodruff: and on the daily download, margaret warner examines how the presidential campaigns are using social media to ampl
talk. >>> issue one. arab uproar. u.s. diplomatic missions were hit by two separate afax this -- attacks this week. both on tuesday, the anniversary of the twin showers, shanksville and penalty gone atrocities. in cairo, egyptian protesters scaled the walls of the u.s. embassy, desecrated a u.s. flag and raised a black islamic flag that praised the prophet mohammed. in libya, the attack at the u.s. benghazi consulate turned deadly when they fired guns, burned the compound and burned the building. four americans were murdered including the embassy, christopher stevens. secretary of state hillary clinton condemned the benghazi crimes. >> how could this happen in a country we help liberate in a city we helped save from destruction? >> the attacks in both libya and egypt are linked to a film called innocent of muslims, made by a california-based director. the movie depictures the prophet mohammed as a quote unquote fraud and a philanderer. a 14-minute trailer of the film was dubbed into egyptian arabic and posted on youtube, thus shared on the internet, including the muslim w
the attack on the u.s. consulate in libya that killed four americans, including the ambassador. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight: we get the latest on the deadly assault, believed to have been planned in advance and sparked by an anti-muslim internet video. >> woodruff: plus, we examine the move by governor romney to criticize the president's handling of the libya tinderbox. was it justified or not? we hear from both sides. >> ifill: then, jeffrey brown looks at how the latest iphone upgrade is accelerating competition in the smartphone industry. >> woodruff: are chemicals sprayed in oregon's forests dangerous or not? we have a report from our partners at the center for investigative reporting. >> they're spraying with helicopters all these ridged tops, so everything they're spraying up top eventually gets down to all of these residents. >> forced application of herbicides is done in accordance with all state laws. and we believe it does not represent an unreasonable harm. >> ifill: and margaret warner gets a snapshot of poverty in americ
of gains for the s&p case- shiller home price index. and consumer's are feeling more optimistic. the conference board's confidence index rose to 70.3 in september, marking its highest level since february. these two groups, consumers and housing, are significant because of their influence over the entire economy. >> with the improvement in consumer confidence, we think that consumer spending could pick up as we go into next year. especially since the housing market is showing signs of life and moem prices are starting to firm up. but the encouraging data didn't help stock prices today. instead, comments by central bankers in the u.s. and europe weighed on today's trading. the dow lost 101, the nasdaq shed 43, the s&p is down 15. the head of the philadelphia federal reserve questioned what he called the "meager benefits" of the fed's latest bond buying program. and a european central bank member said his agency would not help restructure greek government debt. also weighing on stocks today, high anxiety about third-quarter earnings. u.s. corporate profits have outpaced the broade
- struggling economy. u.s. employers did add 96,000 jobs in august, but that was well short of expectations. in addition, revised numbers showed 41,000 fewer jobs were created in june and july than first estimated. and the key manufacturing sector dropped 15,000 workers, the largest decline in two years. president obama left charlotte shortly after the report was released, traveling with vice- president biden to portsmouth, new hampshire. there, he emphasized that overall, the private sector is adding jobs. >> today, we learned that, after losing around 800,000 jobs a month when i took office, business once again added jobs for the 30th month in row, a total of more than 4.6 million jobs. ( cheers and applause ) but... but that's not good enough. we know it's not good enough; we need to create more jobs faster. we need to fill the hole left by this recession faster. we need to come out of this crisis stronger. >> brown: and the president insisted all of that could happen much faster, provided republicans in congress are willing to work with him. >> if the republicans are serious about being
cars and threw rocks outside a u.s. military base in kabul today, as protests continued over an anti- muslim video. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we focus on the war in afghanistan, after weekend attacks killed six u.s. troops and caused $200 million worth of damage to american assets. >> ifill: then, we turn to the presidential race, where republicans are retooling their message amid sliding poll numbers. >> woodruff: spencer michels has the story of the conversion of a climate change skeptic, but that turnaround won't end the argument. >> the global warming debate centers on years of data and whether it is reliable and also on politics. >> ifill: are doctors padding bills and overcharging medicare? hari sreenivasan examines an investigation into possible fraud. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. intel. sponsors of tomrorow. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social
hourly. from 7:00 in the morning until midnight. >> woodruff: what's behind the drop in s.a.t. scores? ray suarez looks at the surge in the number of students taking the test, and what it tells us about learning. >> ifill: plus, we talk with journalist bob merry. his new book explores how voters, pollsters, and historians judge presidents. >> you can't be a leader of destiny, as i describe it, and change the critical landscape simply because you got elected president and willed to do it. the country has to need that or want that. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> intel. sponsors of tomorrow. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you
the night off. there's almost $3 trillion in u.s. mutual fund money markets. regulators want to make them safer. the third quarter ends for investors. it's been a good quarter and it could get better if history is any guide. then the c.e.o. of platinum miner stillwater mining joins us. global demand and why platinum is cheaper than gold. that and more tonight on n.b.r.! an unusually public battle over money market regulation begins our broadcast time. the debate is testing the regulatory structure put in place by the dodd-frank financial reforms after the credit crisis. under pressure from treasury secretary timothy geithner, the new financial stability oversight council is making a strong push for controversial rules aimed at preventing a run on what many think of as a safer place for investors to put their money. darren gersh explains. >> reporter: for an investment designed to be as boring as possible, money market funds have set off a fierce regulatory battle. last month, the s.e.c. deadlocked over new rules to strengthen money market fund regulation. today, the new financial stabilit
about their immigration status, if it seems in doubt. the u.s. supreme court upheld the provision last june, but opponents made a final bid to delay it. nato leaders today defended scaling back joint operations with afghan forces as "prudent and temporary." the decision followed attacks by afghan soldiers and police on coalition troops. nato secretary-general anders fogh rasmussen said the announcement proves the afghans are "already capable of operating on their own." and white house spokesman jay carney said the u.s. remains on track to withdraw most troops by the end of 2014. >> the policy of gradually turning over security to afghan forces continues. and that is part of a broader strategy that will result in more american troops coming home and afghans taking more and greater responsibility for the security of their nation. and that process continues. >> sreenivasan: some british lawmakers warned that scaling back joint operations with the afghans could undermine the transition. there was new violence today over that american-made film that disparages the prophet muhammad. a suicid
around the globe, and here at home, where the s&p 500 stock index jumps to pre-crisis levels. how are investors feeling today, compared to four years ago? >> susie: and amazon introduces a new kindle fire, and the new paperwhite e-reader. we look at how its new models stack up. >> tom: that and more tonight on nbr! >> susie: u.s. stocks rallied to their highest levels in four years after europe's central bank announced a sweeping plan to solve the region's debt crisis. five weeks after pledging to do "whatever it takes" to preserve the euro, e.c.b. president mario draghi delivered on his promise by launching a program to buy unlimited quantities of euro- zone bonds. investors around the globe reacted to the concrete move with broad-based buying of stocks. on wall street, all the major averages rose by about 2%-- the dow skyrocketed 245 points, the nasdaq surged 66, and the s&p 500 jumped almost 29 points. mario draghi is finally getting his way. the head of europe's central bank has been battling the region's power players on exactly how to save europe. draghi's plan for unlimited
a quarter of the c.f.o.'s polled say their biggest worry is the upcoming fiscal cliff: >> some thrding about where things really are going, so they can set strategy and execute that strategy. we're going to be stuck in this for a while. as for the c.e.o. survey from the business roundtable, the chief executives point to the coming fiscal cliff and the potential impact from higher taxes and government spending cuts. chairman of the business roundtable, boeing c.e.o. jim mcnerney said the uncertainty is "cold water on long-term planing." >> reporter: i'm erika miller in new york. still ahead, i'll look at how the outcome of the presidential election could impact gold prices. i'll interview gold trader anthony neglia. >> tom: european markets tumbled as greek workers called a 24 hour strike to protest new austerity measures. over 50,000 people gathered to protest new salary and pension cuts, near the parliament building in athens, and some of the protests erupted into violence. on wall street: the dow fell 44 points, the nasdaq lost 24, and the s&p down eight points. >> tom: radio shack shook u
with 1930s values and views, cowboy, not very knowledgeable, and he knocked that dead by his appearance and the way he handled himself. romney comes in and is similarly caricatured partly because of his own mistakes and partly because of what democrats said about him, partly because of the merciless attacks from the media on him. so he's got to be a fighter, someone who's competent, tough and takes the measure of barack obama and says look, we can't take four more years of this and here's where we're going. if he comes in there tough and competent and destroys that caricature, i think he can still wake up this country, and i think there's still a chance he can turn it around. he's got to win it, though, john. >> obama's campaign staff is telling everybody it sees how good romney is at debating. >> well, each of the campaigns sent out a memo basically saying how good the other guy is and stressing all of their guy's flaws. ironically, they are right. both of talented debaters. obama has some advantages. he's debated in the general election stage before. romney has the advantage of having
around the muslim world for a fourth day with protests outside u.s. embassies in the middle east, africa, and asia today. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on the demonstrations, and the return of the remains of four americans killed in libya. >> woodruff: then, did the big bank bailouts here in the u.s. work? ray suarez gets two views on this fourth anniversary of the fall of lehman brothers. >> brown: david brooks and ruth marcus analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: and hari sreenivasan talks with journalist sasha issenberg about his new book exploring how the campaigns are mining data to boost turnout in november. >> whether you are likely to default on your loan or pay off your bill on time or run up $500 on your credit card in a given month, on trying to predict who you are going vote in november, who are you likely to vote for, what issues do you care about. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf and from carnegie foundation >> a
industry. >> hundreds of factories large and small will ship over 200,000 tons of shrimp to the u.s. this year. but there's a darker side to the business here. one that involves human trafficking, corruption, and violence against workers. >> warner: we look at the growing use of potent and sometimes deadly street drugs, known as bath salts, also the subject of our extensive online report today. >> woodruff: plus, jeffrey brown explores an intriguing scrap of paper that just might show jesus was married. >> so jesus said to them-- that would be his disciples-- "my wife." it is the only extant piece of early christian literature where jesus talks about having a wife. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs sta
it on the shift to tablet computing. >> tom: he's "n.b.r.'s" longest running market monitor guest and he's been in the bull camp for three years. tonight investech's james stack tells us why he's pulling in his horns. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> tom: hiring stalled in august. expectations were for robust job growth last month. but, susie, when the numbers were added up, they fell way short. >> susie: tom, today's disappointing jobs report is fueling speculation the federal reserve will have to step in to further stimulate the economy. here's a closer look at the job numbers: businesses added only 96,000 new jobs to payrolls last month: economists were expecting 125,000. meanwhile, the unemployment rate slipped to 8.1%: down from 8.3% in july. >> susie: but, that decline is not what it seems. we have two reports looking at the labor market and the political reaction to today's job numbers. we begin with erika miller in new york. >> reporter: a drop in the unemployment rate is often a good thing. but not this month. an increasing number of job seekers quit looking for work. so
the anti-islam film produced in the u.s. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we assess what's fueling the anger in the muslim world, and what can be done to tamp it down. >> woodruff: then, ray suarez examines the move to end a rite of passage on some college campuses that's turned dangerous and sometimes lethal. >> today we saw students that were a part of it and that were excited about it, that were standing up saying i commit to end hate. >> brown: we go behind the frontlines with the rebels in syria to a town that's turned into a vicious battleground, its people ravaged by war. >> a year ago none of these men had ever carried a gun or a bomb. today they're making them. >> woodruff: we update the presidential race as mitt romney releases his 2011 income taxes, showing he paid at a rate of 14%. >> brown: and mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf
since december of 2007. the dow rose 53 points, the nasdaq added 28, and the s&p up nearly six. the major averages gained ground for the second week in a row. the dow in with the biggest weekly pop, up over 2%. back to that big change for the dow 30, kraft is out and united healthcare is in, reflecting the growing role of healthcare in the economy. it's the first change to the industrial average's roster in three years. today's move comes as kraft prepares to split its business into two parts. the global snack maker is spinning off its north american grocery brands into a separate publicly traded company. >> we had to do something about kraft. we didn't feel that the two pieces or either piece would be appropriate for the dow jones industrials going forward, so we decided to take the opportunity to make the change. >> susie: united healthcare is the first health insurer in the dow. the change reflects the increasing importance of healthcare spending in the u.s. economy. it now accounts for almost 8% of g.d.p. >> healthcare insurance is a big part of the economy, the financial m
lowered its 2013 g.d.p. forecasts. it now expects u.s. economic growth will be under 2% next year. globally, it sees g.d.p. growth at 2.7%. economists say that may be optimistic. >> things could actually turn out worse than what their forecasts are quite easily. the big wildcards are, what's the effect of qe3 on activity going forward? how quickly can european policy makers start to implement the proposals they've recently made? and how quickly can china start to stimulate its economy? >> reporter: there's one thing that will help fedex short-term: the iphone 5. fedex is apple's primary shipping partner on the hot new device, and, in spite of global economic weakness, some analysts think now is a good time to buy the stock. >> their earnings are down from a year ago, but they are still strongly profitable, generating a lot of cash and using that cash to invest in their business so that when the economy does come back-- and it will eventually come back-- this is a company that will benefit. >> reporter: the next update from fedex will come at an investor meeting the second week in
before the scandal broke. that happened after the shooting death of a u.s. border patrol agent in december 2010. the report said lower-level officials should have briefed holder on the situation earlier on. for more on the findings, we're joined by evan perez, who covers the justice department for the "wall street journal." evan, welcome. remind us first what this was all about. >> well, this was an operation conceived in phoenix, in the a.t.f. office in phoenix. and the plan was to basically go after big-gun traffickers. they wanted to follow guns and see where it led and see if they could get to some major figures in gun trafficking. it was in 2009/2010 and they allowed, essentially, agents allowed about 2,000 firearms to be trafficked to suspected smugglers, many of which were-- have turned up in months since in crime scenes in mexico and the united states. there was very little effort to interdict the weapons to stop them from going across the border and, of course, with the death of agent bryan terry and other deaths, we see what the consequences are. >> brown: so the key
. >> brown: then, was the attack on the u.s. mission in libya the work of al qaeda? we take a look. >> woodruff: from our american graduate series, ray suarez reports on growing pains for north dakota schools brought on by the oil boom. >> i always make it very clear to any perspective teachers of what they are really getting themselves into. i tell them this is the new wild west. >> brown: on the "daily download," we examine how the candidates are using video games to push early voting. >> woodruff: and regular pro referees are back on the football field tonight after three weeks of questionable calls by replacements. we talk to npr's mike pesca about the deal struck with the nfl. >> brown: that's all ahead. on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. an
three points, but the nasdaq lost five, and the s&p slipped almost two points. >> reporter: fedex is called a "bellweather," that's because you can tell how the economy is doing based on how many packages it ships around the world. the more it moves, the better things are, the less it ships, well, that's not so good. and fedex says its not shipping as much these days. with europe in recession, and china slowing down, it's no wonder fedex cut its profit forecast for its fiscal first quarter that ended august 31. fedex will still make money, but not as much. it now expects per share earnings of $1.43 at best, much lower than its previous forecast of $1.60. the new outlook puts fedex on track for its first yearly earnings decline since 2009. final results come out on september 18. investors sold the stock, with shares tumbling 3% at the opening bell; they recovered a bit by the close. arch-rival u.p.s. also struggling. the company lowered its 2012 earnings forecast in july, blaming it on global economic uncertainty. >> reporter: i'm diane eastabrook still ahead small businesses tell
exchanged by the u.s. and israel as prime minister netanyahu calls for a tougher stand on iran's nuclear program. >> brown: and we explore why the opening of the september 11 museum has been delayed for another year at least. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the annual remembrance of 9/11 brought somber ceremony and muted politics today. americans looked back on a day that shook the world and led to a decade of war. >> keith george... ifill: a day of remembrance began at ground zero, where new yorkers gathered under a crisp blue sky, reminiscent of the day of the attack eleven
nation" magazine, "the 1% court," devoted entirely to the u.s. supreme court. it's one you'll not want to miss -- and not because it opens with an article jointly written by me and the historian bernard weisberger. our mission was simply to remind the reader of what's obvious. that because of the partisan gridlock paralyzing both president and congress, more than ever the court has become the most powerful branch of government, and the center of a controversy which may shape the fate of democracy for generations to come. with me to talk about this is "the nation" magazine's editor and publisher katrina vanden heuvel. she's a frequent presence on the talk news shows and a familiar byline in major publications. she has been one of those out in front, calling the president to task for orphaning his values and promises, as can be seen in her most recent book, "the change i believe in: fighting for progress in the age of obama." the prolific jamie raskin also joins us. one of the country's leading scholars on constitutional law, he teaches at american university and is a maryland state sena
that cliff to see what would happen, who would be hurt and for how long. hello everyone. u.s. markets are closed for the labor day holiday, which makes this a great time to step back and tackle one of the biggest threats to our nation's economy. it's called the fiscal cliff. maybe you've heard about all the automatic tax increases and spending cuts that make up the fiscal cliff. now, before you say this is just another silly inside-the-beltway mess that doesn't affect my life. we want to tell you that the fiscal cliff is different. tonight, we're going to tell you what all this means to you, to our economy and our future. thelma and louise made pop history when they defiantly drove off that cliff. but this january, congress could steer the u.s. off a different cliff. and when someone falls off a cliff in washington, there are no stunt men to pick them up. on january 1, 2013, tax breaks worth $416 billion will expire. spending on things like defense, medicare payments to doctors will be slashed by $65 billion. add it all up and you are talking about cutting roughly half a trillion doll
turn to susan page, washington bureau chief of "u.s.a. today." and stuart rothenberg of the "rothenberg political report" and "roll call" newspaper. good to have you both back with us again. >> thanks. woodruff: stu, where does this race stand right now with conventions over? >> i'm not sure we know, judy. it depends whether we're still seeing the bounce out of the democratic convention or whether this is the new normal. you know, coming out of these events is almost the worst time to try to figure out exactly where the race is. i think two or three days from now things will have settled down and we'll know whether the president has added to his overall reputation and lead in the race. i think he certainly is better off now than he looked a week ago. >> woodruff: he did pick up a few points, the president did. >> he did. in fact i think we've hit a turning point in the campaign. all the ads, all the newsy vents for months and months failed to shake this race, essentially a tie. now president obama has a narrow lead but a real lead in a series of polls, a gallup poll, the pew poll. i thi
, the embattled government pledged support for the u.n.'s new diplomatic envoy, lakhdar brahimi. the 78-year-old former algerian diplomat replaces kofi annan, who resigned last month after his peace plan failed to halt the country's civil war. in damascus, the syrian information minister voiced hope that brahimi will succeed. >> ( translated ): syria welcomed the appointment of lakhdar brahimi, and will offer him every possible help, the maximum assistance the way we did with kofi annan. we will make sure his mission will not lead to a blocked wall like what happened with kofi annan, when the external sides did not respond to his mission and international role. >> holman: meanwhile, the new head of the international red cross arrived in syria. he planned to appeal for greater humanitarian access to civilians caught in the fighting. thousands of syrians have become refugees, death toll and opposition groups say 5,000 were killed in the conflict in august-- the highest monthly death toll yet. the u.n.'s children's fund-- unicef-- estimates 1,600 people died last week alone. a nato soldier was
the fatal assault on the u.s. consulate there that killed the american ambassador. on sunday, libyan president mohammed el-megaref ordered all militias to obey the government or disband. in egypt today, 14 members of an extremist group were sentenced to death by hanging. the men were convicted in attacks on a police station and bank in the sinai peninsula in june of 2011. six of the men were present for sentencing but eight others were tried in absentia and remain fugitives. a former police chief at the heart of a major political scandal in china is facing 15 years in prison. that sentence was imposed today on wang lijun for trying to defect to the u.s., and helping cover up the murder of a british businessman. wang apologized for his crimes today in court. i truly express my repentance to the court for the criminal behavior in the law that i broke. i will pay off the pity and hurt that i caused throughout the rest of my life to the people and the party that care about me. for now i can only sincerely say that i'm sorry, i'm truly sorry i let you down. >> sreenivasan: the wang case l
at the u.s. in a speech to the general assembly, he talked of a new world order, without what he called the hegemony of arrogance. he also denounced israeli threats of a military strike against iran's nuclear sites. >> ( translated ): testing new generations of ultra-modern weaponry and the pledge to disclose these armaments in due time is now being used as a new language of threat against nations to coerce them into accepting a new era of hegemony. continued threat by the uncivilized zionists to resort to military action against our great nation is a clear example of this bitter reality. >> sreenivasan: the u.s. delegation boycotted the speech, citing ahmadinejad's repeated diatribes against israel. later, the new, islamist president of egypt mohammed morsi also took on israel, over the plight of the palestinians. >> ( translated ): it is shameful that the free world would accept that a party in the international community may continue to deny the rights of a nation that looks to independence over decades, no matter what justification. it is also shameful that settlements continue on t
on it to ease its mounting losses. the u.s. economy shows more signs of slowing, and slowing down faster than expected. but silver has been red hot. where is the demand coming from and can it last? we talk with phil baker, the c.e.o. of hecla mining. that and more tonight on nbr! we begin with discouraging news about the sluggish economy. by the broadest measurement, economic growth slowed sharply in the second quarter. the gross domestic product was revised considerably lower today. growth was 1.3% in the april through june period. just a month ago, the estimate was 1.7%. add that to a big drop in purchases of big ticket items, like washing machines and furniture. in august, durable goods orders fell 13.2%, and you've got an economy that's just muddling along. but one ray of encouragement-- fewer people filed for unemployment benefits for the first time last week. claims fell by 26,000 to their july lows of 359,000 claims. on wall street, the dow jumped 72 points, the nasdaq added almost 43 points, the s&p up 13. while the u.s. continues working through problems left over by the great recess
. thirdly vote. and fourthly pray for the next 72 days. >> ralph reed was in s ory in tampa, his reincarnation in full swing. but there are some other things you need to know about reid. first when he bailed out of the christian coalition in 1997, only two years after his big "time" magazine cover story, he had driven the organization into the ground. it was nearly bankrupt, under investigation by the federal election commission, and facing charges from its own financial officer that reed's cronies had ripped off almost a million dollars. despite that record, reid went on to flourish in the early years of george w. bush. until it was disclosed that the "right hand of god" had his other hand out to his old friend, the super-lobbyist jack abramoff, and was raking in the cash. reid's allies today say they're not bothered by all that. ralph has a great track record, said one. reid's ties to abramoff are quote, "largely in the rear-view mirror." perhaps. but the view from the rear-view mirror can be quite revealing. let's take a look. >> senator, i respectively invoke the privilege as
not spend their 20s in their childhood bedrooms, looking up at fading obama posters wondering when they can move out and get on with their lives! >> brown: the man at the top of the ticket also renewed a theme from his speech-- winning over former supporters of the president. >> i need to have you do the work on november 6 that gets me elected in florida. for that to happen, you are going to have to go out and find a person or two who voted for barack obama. i know they're here-- you can see some of the glue on the back of their bumper sticker. find them and convince them to get on the team. >> brown: romney then made a change to his schedule and diverted to louisiana to survey hurricane isaac storm damage with republican governor bobby jindal. >> i'm here to learn and obviously draw some attention to what's going on here so that people around the country know that the folks here need help. >> brown: it was all part of building on hoped-for momentum from the convention, which last night focused on mitt romney, the man and the leader. friends gave testimonials to his many unpublicized works
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